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Drink, Rest, Shade – MOM’s New Rules for Workplace Safety!

Drink, Rest, Shade - MOMs New Rules for Workplace Safety in Singapore
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  1. The Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) Act in Singapore emphasises employers’ responsibility for ensuring risk-free workplaces.
  2. Four aspects – Acclimatise, Drink, Rest, and Shade – are being promoted as crucial to workers’ health, particularly those exposed to heat stress.
  3. Concerns on work safety and health standards in Singapore remain relevant, and measures are in place to uphold these standards.

The Ministry of Manpower (MOM) reports that, under the Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) Act, Singapore holds employers and occupiers responsible for promoting safe, risk-free workplaces.

Ensuring their workplaces are without potential risks that can harm health and contribute towards accidents is of utmost precedence.

The Act serves as an unquestionable legal framework to promote and maintain workplace safety and health standards countrywide.

Raising the Bar: WSH Act in Singapore

Let’s make it clear.

In sunny Singapore, workplace safety isn’t a glossy brochure promise; it’s law.

The WSH Act implies, in no uncertain terms, that every employee deserves a safe work station.

And who is responsible?

The employers, of course.

They are charged with making work environments safe, as well as accident and risk-free.

Even visitors, contractors, and customers are under its shade of protection.

But the responsibility is shared.

Employees too have a role in ensuring their own safety, and that of their co-workers.

The Mogul of Measures: Acclimatise, Drink, Rest, Shade

Now, the MOM suggests a quartet of measures to beat the heat – Acclimatise, Drink, Rest, Shade.

To acclimatise, employees new to Singapore or those returning from leave should gradually increase their daily heat exposure over a week.

Employers are to identify workers susceptible to heat stress and rearrange their tasks responsibly.

Drinking up to hydrate, ideally, hourly, takes second place.

And employers are encouraged to provide cool drinking water near work areas.

Then comes ‘Rest’.

Companies should arrange enough rest time under the shade, near to the work area.

Especially when temperatures soar past 32°C, an hourly rest break of minimum 10 minutes becomes essential even for light work.

Lastly, reducing direct sun exposure at rest areas and the workplace as far as possible is recommended, such as by setting up tents.

A Shared Solution: Employee Rights and Responsibilities

Every worker has the right to a safe workplace.

And each has a responsibility to make it so.

Resources such as training and consultancy services are available, aimed at improving workplace safety measures and emphasising the concept of shared responsibility.

Indeed, everyone has a role to play in creating a safe work environment, from managers and supervisors to the employees on the ground.

Data Tells a Story: Statistics and Case Studies

In Singapore, over the years, many have seen the fulfilling benefits of adhering to safety regulations, both for employees and their companies.

In reality, safe workplaces are also more efficient and productive.

On the flip side, accidents are an eye-opener to the importance of health and safety measures, reminding businesses that it is always wiser to prevent than to react.

The Roadblocks: Challenges and Solutions

Implementing safety measures isn’t always smooth sailing.

Challenges show up thick and fast.

Whether it be difficulty in ensuring compliance or providing adequate training, businesses face many stumbling blocks in their pursuit of a safe workplace.

But every problem has a solution.

And in this case, it can often lie within the company’s safety culture, regular evaluations, and continuous improvements.

Ending on a High Note

Workplace safety is no child’s play.

But by following the rules, both employers and employees can ensure a safer environment for everyone.

After all, safety is not just a policy; it’s a practice.

What could be the value of a life saved or an accident avoided?

It’s simply immeasurable.

Isn’t it?

What do you think?

Written by Patrick Tan

Meet Patrick, the word wizard of Daily.SG! He whips up news about Singapore that's so simple, even toddlers give him a thumbs up. When he's not writing, you'll find him sipping milk tea, gliding on skates, or striking a yoga pose. Dive into his stories and feel the sprinkle of fun and a whole lot of heart!

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